Monday, September 2, 2013

Foster Pet Deductions Allowed On Taxes (as of January 2013)

Foster Pet Deductions Allowed On Taxes (as of January 2013) 
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Sprite came to us as a Foster dog in Dec. 2010
Did you foster a pet or more in 2013? If so, you might be able to deduct the related expenses on your federal taxes.   The IRS will recognize expenses related to fostering dogs and cats for approved charities.
An approved charity, in turn, is one that holds 501(c)(3) designation as a Not-for-Profit organization. So things like pet food, medicines, veterinary bills, and crates could all be deductible. The judgment indicates that a portion of household utilities could be considered an expense, provided that an area of your home is dedicated just to caring for the foster animal(s).

 HOW IT WORKS:

If annual tax deduction claims exceed $250, a foster caregiver will need to obtain an official letter from the registered charity he/she volunteers for, confirming that he/she volunteers and/or fosters for their organization. 
   An approved/registered charity is one that has a recognized 501(c)(3) designation as a Not-for-Profit organization. All volunteer expenses incurred while fostering dogs and/or cats or activities directly related to charitable work for approved charities may be claimed on taxes. Fostering expenses eligible for deduction include: food, medicines, veterinary bills, crates, garbage bags, cleaning supplies and other similar items. If there is a specific area of a home that is used only for the care of animals, a portion of utilities can also be claimed.  
   If you are a foster caregiver for dog(s) and would like to claim expenses ensure you keep all relevant receipts. If your expenses exceed $250 in a given year, you will need to obtain an official letter from the registered charity confirming you are volunteering and/or fostering for their organization.
Read more at http://www.dogheirs.com/dogheirs/posts/3063-tax-deductions-available-to-foster-pet-parents#sQOrLfQAk6tqtd2f.99

If annual tax deduction claims exceed $250, a foster caregiver will need to obtain an official letter from the registered charity he/she volunteers for, confirming that he/she volunteers and/or fosters for their organization. An approved/registered charity is one that has a recognized 501(c)(3) designation as a Not-for-Profit organization. All volunteer expenses incurred while fostering dogs and/or cats or activities directly related to charitable work for approved charities may be claimed on taxes. Fostering expenses eligible for deduction include: food, medicines, veterinary bills, crates, garbage bags, cleaning supplies and other similar items. If there is a specific area of a home that is used only for the care of animals, a portion of utilities can also be claimed. The Humane Society of the United States has said that their volunteers spend, on average, between $2,000 and $15,000 each year of their own money related to fostering animals. "This is the first time the court has addressed these expenses," said Jonathan Lovvorn, chief counsel of the Humane Society. "Now we want to get the word out." If you are a foster caregiver for dog(s) and would like to claim expenses ensure you keep all relevant receipts. If your expenses exceed $250 in a given year, you will need to obtain an official letter from the registered charity confirming you are volunteering and/or fostering for their organization.
Read more at http://www.dogheirs.com/dogheirs/posts/3063-tax-deductions-available-to-foster-pet-parents#sQOrLfQAk6tqtd2f.99
If annual tax deduction claims exceed $250, a foster caregiver will need to obtain an official letter from the registered charity he/she volunteers for, confirming that he/she volunteers and/or fosters for their organization. An approved/registered charity is one that has a recognized 501(c)(3) designation as a Not-for-Profit organization. All volunteer expenses incurred while fostering dogs and/or cats or activities directly related to charitable work for approved charities may be claimed on taxes. Fostering expenses eligible for deduction include: food, medicines, veterinary bills, crates, garbage bags, cleaning supplies and other similar items. If there is a specific area of a home that is used only for the care of animals, a portion of utilities can also be claimed. The Humane Society of the United States has said that their volunteers spend, on average, between $2,000 and $15,000 each year of their own money related to fostering animals. "This is the first time the court has addressed these expenses," said Jonathan Lovvorn, chief counsel of the Humane Society. "Now we want to get the word out." If you are a foster caregiver for dog(s) and would like to claim expenses ensure you keep all relevant receipts. If your expenses exceed $250 in a given year, you will need to obtain an official letter from the registered charity confirming you are volunteering and/or fostering for their organization.
Read more at http://www.dogheirs.com/dogheirs/posts/3063-tax-deductions-available-to-foster-pet-parents#sQOrLfQAk6tqtd2f.99



If you foster a dog you may be eligible for tax deductions. Foster pet parents in the United States who would like to claim expenses on their personal taxes now have a much clearer set of guidelines thanks to one woman who sued the Internal Revenue Service in court and won. Jan Van Dusen fosters feral cats out of her home in California and took the IRS to court over "unreimbursed volunteer expenses while caring for foster cats in her private residence." She had claimed "payments for veterinary services, pet supplies, cleaning supplies and household." Her claim for $12,068 was apparently rejected by the IRS. However, the court recognized her claim in large part, except for some expenses that could not be directly tied to pet care. As a result of Van Dusen v. Commissioner, the IRS will recognize expenses related to fostering dogs and cats for approved charities. If annual tax deduction claims exceed $250, a foster caregiver will need to obtain an official letter from the registered charity he/she volunteers for, confirming that he/she volunteers and/or fosters for their organization. An approved/registered charity is one that has a recognized 501(c)(3) designation as a Not-for-Profit organization. All volunteer expenses incurred while fostering dogs and/or cats or activities directly related to charitable work for approved charities may be claimed on taxes. Fostering expenses eligible for deduction include: food, medicines, veterinary bills, crates, garbage bags, cleaning supplies and other similar items. If there is a specific area of a home that is used only for the care of animals, a portion of utilities can also be claimed. The Humane Society of the United States has said that their volunteers spend, on average, between $2,000 and $15,000 each year of their own money related to fostering animals. "This is the first time the court has addressed these expenses," said Jonathan Lovvorn, chief counsel of the Humane Society. "Now we want to get the word out." If you are a foster caregiver for dog(s) and would like to claim expenses ensure you keep all relevant receipts. If your expenses exceed $250 in a given year, you will need to obtain an official letter from the registered charity confirming you are volunteering and/or fostering for their organization. Foster pet parents and rescues are hard at work caring for many wonderful dogs while they wait to find forever homes. Take a look at the adoptable dogs listed on DogHeirs.
Read more at http://www.dogheirs.com/dogheirs/posts/3063-tax-deductions-available-to-foster-pet-parents#sQOrLfQAk6tqtd2f.99
If you foster a dog you may be eligible for tax deductions. Foster pet parents in the United States who would like to claim expenses on their personal taxes now have a much clearer set of guidelines thanks to one woman who sued the Internal Revenue Service in court and won. Jan Van Dusen fosters feral cats out of her home in California and took the IRS to court over "unreimbursed volunteer expenses while caring for foster cats in her private residence." She had claimed "payments for veterinary services, pet supplies, cleaning supplies and household." Her claim for $12,068 was apparently rejected by the IRS. However, the court recognized her claim in large part, except for some expenses that could not be directly tied to pet care. As a result of Van Dusen v. Commissioner, the IRS will recognize expenses related to fostering dogs and cats for approved charities. If annual tax deduction claims exceed $250, a foster caregiver will need to obtain an official letter from the registered charity he/she volunteers for, confirming that he/she volunteers and/or fosters for their organization. An approved/registered charity is one that has a recognized 501(c)(3) designation as a Not-for-Profit organization. All volunteer expenses incurred while fostering dogs and/or cats or activities directly related to charitable work for approved charities may be claimed on taxes. Fostering expenses eligible for deduction include: food, medicines, veterinary bills, crates, garbage bags, cleaning supplies and other similar items. If there is a specific area of a home that is used only for the care of animals, a portion of utilities can also be claimed. The Humane Society of the United States has said that their volunteers spend, on average, between $2,000 and $15,000 each year of their own money related to fostering animals. "This is the first time the court has addressed these expenses," said Jonathan Lovvorn, chief counsel of the Humane Society. "Now we want to get the word out." If you are a foster caregiver for dog(s) and would like to claim expenses ensure you keep all relevant receipts. If your expenses exceed $250 in a given year, you will need to obtain an official letter from the registered charity confirming you are volunteering and/or fostering for their organization. Foster pet parents and rescues are hard at work caring for many wonderful dogs while they wait to find forever homes. Take a look at the adoptable dogs listed on DogHeirs.
Read more at http://www.dogheirs.com/dogheirs/posts/3063-tax-deductions-available-to-foster-pet-parents#sQOrLfQAk6tqtd2f.99


Gift/Memorial Suggestions

Several of our friends have lost loved ones (human and pets) and we found that one of the best ways to honor their memory is to give to an animal charity.
What better way to recognize a life of love, than by giving another life a chance for love?
We donate to many animal rescues, but because we volunteer with
DC Weimaraner Rescue and Coast-to-Coast Dachshund Rescue, those are our 2 favorites.
Consider giving the chance of life to a dog or cat.

Great Books by our friends

Great Books by our friends
Check out these great books (yeah, Rob's are in there, too)

About us

We're two married guys who enjoy the simple things in life, especially our dogs. We volunteer for dog rescues, enjoy splitting dinners, exercising, blogging, helping friends and neighbors, ghost investigations, coffee and tea, Tudor history, weather, superheroes, comic books, mystery novels, traveling, 70s and 80s music, classic country, piano, gardening, writing books on ghosts and spirits, architecture, keeping a clean house, cooking simply, and keeping in shape. You'll find tidbits of all of these things on this blog and more.

Tom and Rob Thinking Hard!

Tom and Rob Thinking Hard!
Wondering what home project to do next

Podcast of Rob's 50 min. interview on Paranormal Filler Radio 7/13/14