Sunday, April 2, 2017

Did You Know? A number of new clouds have been named

    A number of new clouds have been named!  You may have seen these (if you have ever looked up). Now you can amaze those you know with your knowledge of the Volutus,
Flammagenitus, Homogenitus and
Asperitas clouds!

     The cloud species Volutus has been officially named as a new species of cloud in the World Meteorological Organization’s Cloud Atlas. The new cloud species name will now be used by meteorologists operationally around the world. 
Volutus is a long, typically low, horizontal, detached, roll cloud.
Volutus 
   A long, typically low, horizontal, detached, tube-shaped cloud mass, often appearing to roll slowly about a horizontal axis. The roll cloud, volutus, is a soliton, not attached to other clouds and is an example of an undular bore.
This species applies mostly to Stratocumulus and rarely Altocumulus.
- See more at: https://www.wmocloudatlas.org/clouds-species-volutus.html#sthash.wHZaZ6ly.dpuf
flammagenitus
    As well as a new species, several new ‘special clouds’ and supplementary features of existing cloud types have been officially recognized in the atlas which is the official publication of cloud types. It is used as a reference document by operational meteorologists around the world and is also an important training tool for meteorologists, as well as for those working in aviation and at sea.
   Special clouds named in the new edition include: Flammagenitus, which are clouds formed as a result of forest fires; 
  


Flammagenitus
  Clouds may develop as a consequence of convection initiated by heat from forest fires, wildfires or volcanic eruption activity. Clouds that are clearly observed to have originated as a consequence of localized natural heat sources, such as forest fires, wildfires or volcanic activity and which, at least in part, consist of water drops, will be given the name relevant to the genus followed, if appropriate, by the species, variety and any supplementary features, and finally by the special cloud name “flammagenitus.”  Cumulus flammagenitus is also known by the unofficial, common name, 'pyrocumulus'.

Flammagenitus

(Section 2.1.3.6.1) Clouds may develop as a consequence of convection initiated by heat from forest fires, wildfires or volcanic eruption activity. Clouds that are clearly observed to have originated as a consequence of localized natural heat sources, such as forest fires, wildfires or volcanic activity and which, at least in part, consist of water drops, will be given the name relevant to the genus followed, if appropriate, by the species, variety and any supplementary features, and finally by the special cloud name “flammagenitus”, (for example, Cumulus congestus flammagenitus or Cumulonimbus calvus flammagenitus). (Note: Cumulus flammagenitus is also known by the unofficial, common name, 'pyrocumulus').
- See more at: https://www.wmocloudatlas.org/flammagenitus.html#sthash.NQy3uKJ6.dpuf

There is also Homogenitus, which denotes man-made or anthropogenic clouds such as those which form over power station cooling towers.

Homogenituss


Homogenitus
Clouds may also develop as a consequence of human activity. Examples are aircraft condensation trails (contrails), or clouds resulting from industrial processes, such as cumuliform clouds generated by rising thermals above power station cooling towers. Clouds that are clearly observed to have originated specifically as a consequence of human activity will be given the name of the appropriate genus, followed by the special cloud name “homogenitus.” For example, Cumulus cloud formed above industrial plants will be known as Cumulus followed by the special cloud name homogenitus; for example, Cumulus mediocris homogenitus.  
 

 An example of a new supplementary feature is Asperitas, which are well defined wave-like structures in the underside of clouds.
Asperitas



Asperitas
Well-defined, wave-like structures in the underside of the cloud; more chaotic and with less horizontal organization than the variety undulatus. Asperitas is characterized by localized waves in the cloud base, either smooth or dappled with smaller features, sometimes descending into sharp points, as if viewing a roughened sea surface from below. Varying levels of illumination and thickness of the cloud can lead to dramatic visual effects.
 



Gift/Memorial Suggestions

Several of our friends have lost loved ones (human and pets) and we found that one of the best ways to honor their memory is to give to an animal charity.
What better way to recognize a life of love, than by giving another life a chance for love?
We donate to many animal rescues, but because we volunteer with
DC Weimaraner Rescue and Coast-to-Coast Dachshund Rescue, those are our 2 favorites.
Consider giving the chance of life to a dog or cat.

About us

We're two married guys who enjoy the simple things in life, especially our dogs. We volunteer for dog rescues, enjoy splitting dinners, exercising, blogging, helping friends and neighbors, ghost investigations, coffee and tea, Tudor history, weather, superheroes, comic books, mystery novels, traveling, 70s and 80s music, classic country, piano, gardening, writing books on ghosts and spirits, architecture, keeping a clean house, cooking simply, and keeping in shape. You'll find tidbits of all of these things on this blog and more.

Tom and Rob Thinking Hard!

Tom and Rob Thinking Hard!
Wondering what home project to do next